Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center
University of California
Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Kearney News Updates

Jeffrey Mitchell holds outreach soil health presentations to Tulare County fourth-graders!

In what might be the sixth or seventh year in a row, Jeff Mitchell, Cooperative Extension systems specialist at Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center,UC Davis Plant Science department, and Conservation Agricultural Systems Innovation program participated in the annual AgVentures! educational event for several Tulare County public schools fourth-grader classes on May 11, 2018 at the International Ag Center.  This is an annual event that is put on by the Tulare County School District in conjunction with the Tulare County Cooperative Extension and the International Ag Center and it typically involves several hundred students from the local schools.  It turns out to be the classic ‘field trip' for kids and seems to be something that brings excitement and hopefully good learning to large numbers of students.  A short video of some of the action can be seen at the You Tube site https://youtu.be/R4LDy4Ru9ws

Interactive soil health display materials for Tulare County fourth-graders as part of the 2018 AgVentures! field day.

Posted on Monday, May 14, 2018 at 11:37 AM
  • Author: Jeffrey Mitchell

Kearney-based nematologist Andreas Westphal awarded tenure

UC Riverside nematologist Andreas Westphal hosted lunch for staff and academics at the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center May 11 in appreciation for their support. In April, he was awarded tenure. Congratulations Andreas!

Andreas Westphal, center, thanks the staff and academics at the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center.
 
Andreas Westphal, right, with long-time nematology staff research associate Tom Buzo.
 
The Kearney nematology team. Left to right, Iris Montez, Carolina Eberlein, Yu-Chen Wang, Ryan Peckett, Zinthuzar Maung, Andreas Westphal and Tom Buzo.
Posted on Friday, May 11, 2018 at 1:07 PM

The IR-4 Project launched a bee friendly plant search page.

The IR-4 Project at Rutgers University is pleased to announce the launch of the Plant Search page on the Protecting Bees website. Users can search for pollinator attractive plants by zip code, bloom period, sun/light requirements, and/or pollinator attractiveness. Once the search is complete, users can download a printable list of select plants, compare pollinator information (limit of 5 plants), or get detailed information about the attractiveness data and links to the data sources.

This plant search tool is a necessary resource for anyone with an interest in protecting pollinators and growing plants. Planting pollinator attractive plants provides insects and animals with essential resources, while helping plants survive and flourish. All pollinator attractiveness information on Protecting Bees comes from reputable scientific studies or publications. New plants and pollinator information is constantly being added, so be sure to search Protecting Bees for attractive plants when planning for your next planting or when guiding others about pollinator beneficial gardens!

The website is sponsored in part by USDA-NIFA-SCRI. James Bethke's group (San Diego UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor specializing in nurseries and floriculture) and Christine Casey are UC contributors to the larger project's collaborative group. 

Native bee (probably a member of the Megachilidae family) on bush poppy (Dendromecon rigida).

Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at 2:47 PM
  • Author: Amy Abate
  • Contributor: Cristi Palmer

Home is where the habitat is: This Earth Day, consider installing insectary plants.

Help the environment this Earth Day, which falls on Sunday April 22 this year, by installing insectary plants! These plants attract natural enemies such as lady beetles, lacewings, and parasitic wasps. Natural enemies provide biological pest control and can reduce the need for insecticides. Visit the new UC IPM Insectary Plants webpage to learn how to use these plants to your advantage.

The buzz about insectary plants

Biological control, or the use of natural enemies to reduce pests, is an important component of integrated pest management. Fields and orchards may miss out on this control if they do not offer sufficient habitat for natural enemies to thrive. Insectary plants (or insectaries) can change that—they feed and shelter these important insects and make the environment more favorable to them. For instance, sweet alyssum planted near lettuce fields encourages syrphid flies to lay their eggs on crops. More syrphid eggs means more syrphid larvae eating aphids, and perhaps a reduced need for insecticides. Similarly, planting cover crops like buckwheat within vineyards can attract predatory insects, spiders, and parasitic wasps, ultimately keeping leafhoppers and thrips under control.

Flowering insectaries also provide food for bees and other pollinators. There are both greater numbers and more kinds of native bees in fields with an insectary consisting of a row of native shrubs planted along the field edge (called a hedgerow). Native bees also stay in fields with these shrubs longer than they do in fields without them. Therefore, not only do insectaries attract natural enemies, but they can also boost crop pollination and help keep bees healthy.

Insectary plants may attract more pests to your crops, but the benefit is greater than the risk

The possibility of creating more pest problems has been a concern when it comes to installing insectaries. Current research shows that mature hedgerows, in particular, bring more benefits than risks. Hedgerows attract far more natural enemies than insect pests. And despite the fact that birds, rabbits, and mice find refuge in hedgerows, the presence of hedgerows neither increases animal pest problems in the field, nor crop contamination by animal-vectored pathogens. Hedgerow insectaries both benefit wildlife and help to control pests.

How can I install insectary plants?

Visit the Insectary Plants webpage to learn how to establish and manage insectary plants, and determine which types of insectaries may suit your needs and situation. If you need financial assistance to establish insectaries on your farm, consider applying for Conservation Action Plan funds from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) offered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Sources:

Posted on Thursday, April 19, 2018 at 1:48 PM

New discovery shows promise for battling the Asian Citrus Psyllid.

Native to Asia, the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina ciri, was first detected in the United States in June 1998 in Palm Beach County, Florida. Since then, ACP has invaded all other US citrus areas.  It has been detected in 26 of California's 58 counties. Infected psyllids can transmit the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which causes the fatal citrus disease Huanglongbing (HLB). HLB is currently the most devastating threat to the worldwide citrus industry. A citrus tree infected with HLB may not exhibit any symptoms for two years, and will usually die within five years. UC ANR IPM states that there is no known cure. “The only way to protect trees is to prevent spread of the HLB pathogen in the first place, by controlling psyllid populations and removing and destroying any infected trees.”

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) has set up extensive monitoring and quarantine programs to track and try to slow the spread of the insect and disease. Currently, both residential and commercial sites that have citrus are monitored by checking yellow sticky traps. Psyllid and leaf samples are being tested for the presence of HLB.

If ACP is detected in an area, farmers must resort to regular spray programs to try to control the ACP population. This practice negatively impacts efforts to have a citrus crop grown with IPM strategies that rely on beneficial insects. In a ground-breaking discovery encompassing six years of research, an international team of scientists led by UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal announced they've identified the sex pheromone of ACP. This pheromone can be used to attract more ACP to sticky traps. “Having a [pheromone] lure to dramatically improve captures of this psyllid with the conventional sticky traps is a major progress toward [developing] integrated pest management [strategies],” said Professor Jose Robert Parra of the University of Sao Paulo. Read more.

This is an Asian citrus psyllid, which is about the size of an aphid.

Posted on Tuesday, January 2, 2018 at 11:16 AM

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