Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center
University of California
Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Kearney News Updates

Sprayer calibration and coverage training for improved California red scale control in citrus will be held at Lindcove Research and Extension Center on June 13, 2017.

The Citrus Research Board and UC Agriculture and Natural resources have partnered  to present a sprayer calibration and coverage training for improved California red scale control in citrus. The training will be at Lindcove Research and Extension Center (LREC) Tuesday, June 13, 2017, 7:30 am - 1pm. Four hours of continuing education hours have been requested. The agenda includes: California red scale control issues; spray calibration basics; a field demonstration on the differences in coverage based on two ground speeds; a field demonstration based on two fan settings; calibration measuring flow rate and land rate; the the future of spray technology. The meeting will include lunch. Presenters will include Ali Pourreza, UCCE Advisor, Kearney Ag REC (KARE); Beth Grafton-Cardwell, Dept of Entomology UCR, and KARE, and Director of LREC; Lynn Wunderlich, UCCE Central Sierra Farm Advisor; Matt Strmiska, Adaptiv; and Franz Niederholzer, UCCE Colusa County Farm Advisor.   

To register, please contact the Citrus Research Board at 559-738-0246 or register online by June 6th. The cost is $30 per person, and seats are limited to 80 people.

The agenda for the sprayer calibration and coverage training on June 13, 2017.

File photo of adult California red scale.

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 2:07 PM

KARE works with 300 Tulare County Fourth Graders at 2017 AgVentures Day!

KARE outreach and education leader, Laura Van Der Staay, along with UCD Cooperative Extension Cropping Systems Specialist, Jeff Mitchell, had their hands full with over 300 enthusiastic Tulare County 4th graders as part of the 2017 half-day AgVentures extravaganza that was held at the International Ag Center on May 12.  This is the third time the two of them have taken part in this activity that is always a big hit with the kids, teachers and parents.  Students learned about soil science and  research that is underway at the KARE Center related to soil function and management and also had a chance to see up close and personal how soils can change if they are managed using conservation agriculture practices.  While the day is always grueling, both Van Der Staay and Mitchell departed after a hearty hamburger lunch that was provided by the event organizers with the satisfaction of having hopefully expanded horizons and inspired a new generation of science-loving students.

KARE’s Laura Van Der Staay working with Tulare County fourth graders who were part of the 2017 AgVentures Day at the International Ag Center in Tulare, CA, May 12, 2017.

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 1:46 PM
  • Author: Jeffrey Mitchell

Please consider attending the two drone workshops scheduled at Kearney April 13th and April 14th 2017.

UC ANR Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center (KARE) will be the location for two related drone workshops. The goals of these workshops are to provide an overview of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) technology and best practices for data collection, and an insight of drone regulations and data processing to affiliates of the University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR), as well as public and private resource professionals. 

Each workshop costs $30. 

Drone Technology and Data Collection, Thursday, April 13th, 2017, 11:00am to 4:00pm.  This workshop will provide an overview of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) technology and best practices for data collection. It is designed for participants with little to no experience with drone technology, who are interested exploring practical applications of drones for a variety of data collection interests. The workshop will begin with a lecture on drone technology, and considerations for flight planning and deploying your drone.  We will then go outside for a drone demo, where we will be joined by Green Valley International who specializes in LIDAR drone applications, for some hands-on experience with flying a variety of common quad-copter platforms. To conclude the workshop, we will discuss a wide variety of potential scientific and management oriented applications for drones, and associated mission specific considerations. Click here to register.

Drone Regulations and Data ProcessingFriday, April 14th, 2017, from 10:00am to 3:00pm. This workshop is designed for participants with little to no experience with drone data or GIS software applications. Following a brief lecture on regulations and how to prepare for the FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot License test, hands-on exercises will introduce you to the steps you will need to know for processing drone imagery and Lidar data to create your own maps. To conclude the workshop, we will compare the various types of data that can be collected by drones to identify the advantages of each data set for different research and management interests. Click here to register. 

File photo of a previous drone workshop.

Posted on Wednesday, April 5, 2017 at 10:07 PM

UC ANR Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center (KARE) helps students and teachers explore healthy food choices and learn how food is grown.

In March, Kings County has a Farm Day where students and teachers explore healthy food choices, learn how food is grown, interact with farm animals, and build an increased awareness of how agriculture helps our local community and economy. This is achieved by the Kings County Farm Bureau, The Kings County Office of Education and the Kings Fairgrounds partnering to bring the students and presenters together at the Fairgrounds. On March 16, 2017, over 2400 third-graders and 100 teachers and chaperones from 32 schools, as well as presenters for 60 stations attended Farm Day. With the generous donations from The Plant Food People, Greenheart Farms, and awesome volunteers, KARE provided all attendees with short presentations on what it takes to be a healthy plant and what it takes to be a healthy person, followed immediately by workshops where attendees planted leaf lettuce transplants to take home and enjoy.

Fresno County had Farm and Nutrition Day on March 17, 2017, allowing over 4000 third-grade students, teachers, and chaperones from 38 schools experience over 55 interactive presentations at the Big Fresno Fair grounds. Experiential workshops, presentations and displays helped increase participant awareness of agriculture as well as the benefits of making healthy choices. Fresno County Farm Bureau organized the event with the help of several sponsors, volunteers and presenter groups. Again with the generous donations from The Plant Food People, Greenheart Farms, and awesome volunteers, KARE provided all attendees with short presentations on what it takes to be a healthy plant and what it takes to be a healthy person, followed immediately by workshops where attendees planted leaf lettuce transplants to take home and enjoy.

At both events, other UC ANR programs, like 4-H, master gardeners, food and nutrition, small farms advisors, etc., from Kings and Fresno counties also had animals and presentations for the attendees.

Click here to see a Fresno Bee article.

Third grade students at the 2017 Kings County Farm Day transplant leaf lettuce to take home.

Posted on Monday, March 27, 2017 at 3:16 PM

National Poison Prevention Week was March 19-25, 2017.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), poisoning is the number one cause of injury-related death in the United States, and 1073 people in California were poisoned by pesticides in 2014 alone. Each year since 1962, National Poison Prevention Week has taken place during the third week of March, to raise awareness about avoiding these tragedies. No one wants their workers or family members to experience illness or death from pesticide exposure, so the UC IPM Pesticide Safety Education Program (PSEP) would like to bring special attention to preventing pesticide poisoning this week. The program also published a new edition of The Safe and Effective Use of Pesticidesin 2016, which contains a wealth of pesticide safety and hazard prevention information for people who work with pesticides.

Both agricultural and household pesticides can poison people if they are not properly handled. In agriculture, poisoning most often results from pesticide mixing and loading, and the most harm occurs due to spills, splashes and equipment failure. In the home, many pesticide poisoning incidents involve children swallowing pesticides, including garden products, disinfectant cleaners, or other chemicals used to control pests.

One of the most important things you can do to prevent pesticide poisoning is to follow the instructions on the pesticide label. Labels address critical information about how to use a pesticide safely, including the kind of personal protective equipment (PPE) you should wear to prevent overexposure, how much of the product to apply, the minimum time you must wait to enter the area after applying the pesticide (the restricted entry interval), and the minimum time that must pass between application and harvest (preharvest interval).

Labels also include important signal words such as “Danger,” “Warning,” or “Caution” that indicate how acutely toxic the chemical is to humans, as well as directions to avoid pesticide contamination of sensitive areas such as schools and hospitals. These instructions are meant to protect anyone who is at risk of being exposed to hazardous pesticide residues. It is essential to thoroughly read and understand the pesticide label before working with the pesticide, and to carefully comply with label instructions throughout the process. The UC IPM guide to Understanding Pesticide Labels for Making Proper Applications can help you do this, and is available in both English and Spanish.

If you apply pesticides in or around your home, be sure to store them properly and keep them out of the reach of children. Keep in mind that even mothballs may look like candy to very young children. It is illegal and unsafe to store pesticides in food or drink containers, which can easily fool people into consuming them and being poisoned. According to the California Department of Pesticide Regulation, these mistakes caused 62 incidents of child poisoning from pesticide ingestion in California in 2014, and 47 of those cases involved children under six years of age.

To learn more about poisoning and how to prevent it, consider visiting the following resources:

Center for Disease Control and Prevention Leading Causes of Death Reports

California Poison Control

National Poison Prevention Week website

National Pesticide Information Center

UC IPM online course: Proper Pesticide Use to Avoid Illegal Residues

 

When handling pesticides, always use the personal protective equipment required by the law.

Posted on Monday, March 27, 2017 at 10:49 AM

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