Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center
University of California
Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Kearney News Updates

It’s time for DPR license and certificate holders to renew—get units via online courses from UC IPM.

November has arrived, and before you know it we'll be ringing in 2018! For those who hold a license or certificate from the Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), and have a last name starting with the letter M through Z, this is your year to renew.

DPR is urging license and certificate holders to mail in applications now to avoid late fees and to allow enough time for processing so that you can receive your new license or certificate by the beginning of the new year. Renewing early gives DPR time to notify you if you are short any continuing education (CE) hours and allows you time to complete any additional CE courses without having to retest.

If you need more hours to complete your renewal application and don't have time to attend an in-person meeting, then check out the online courses available from the UC Statewide IPM Program (UC IPM).

The following UC IPM and UC Agriculture and Natural Resources online courses have been approved by DPR and are available whenever and wherever you want to take them.

 Laws and Regulations

  • Proper Pesticide Use to Avoid Illegal Residues (2 hours) $40.00 charge
  • Providing Integrated Pest Management Services in Schools and Child Care Settings (1 hour Laws and Regulations and 1 hour Other)

 Other

  • Citrus IPM: California Red Scale (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citricola Scale (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citrus Peelminer (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Citrus Red Mite (1 hour)
  • Citrus IPM: Cottony Cushion Scale (1 hour) 
  • Citrus IPM: Forktailed Bush Katydid (1 hour)
  • Pesticide Application Equipment and Calibration (1.5 hours)
  • Pesticide Resistance (2 hours)
  • Tuta absoluta: A Threat to California Tomatoes (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: IPM – Pesticide Properties (1 hour) 
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation:  Impact of Pesticides - Urban Pesticide Runoff (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: Water Quality and Mitigation:  Bifenthrin and Fipronil (1 hour)
  • Urban Pesticide Runoff and Mitigation: Herbicides and Water Quality (1 hour)

For those of you with last names A through L (or those of you who want to get a jump on your CE hours), look for new online courses from UC IPM coming in early 2018.

View the list of all DPR-approved online or in-person courses. For more information on the license and certification program and renewal information, visit the DPR website.

For more information about pest management and other training opportunities, see the UC IPM website.

A screenshot of an online UC IPM course that has continuing education units approved by CDPR.

Posted on Tuesday, November 7, 2017 at 11:31 AM

August 19th is National Honey Bee Day: Dr. Elina Niño reminds us to help honey bees cope with pests.

National Honey Bee Day is celebrated on the third Saturday of every August. This year it falls on Saturday the 19th. If you use integrated pest management, or IPM, you are probably aware that it can solve pest problems and reduce the use of pesticides that harm beneficial insects, including honey bees. But did you know that it is also used to manage pests that live inside honey bee colonies? In this timely podcast below, Dr. Elina Niño, UCCE apiculture extension specialist, discusses the most serious pests of honey bees, how beekeepers manage them to keep their colonies alive, and what you can do to help bees survive these challenges.

To hear the audio recording, click here

To read the full transcript of the audio, click here.

Successful IPM in honey bee colonies involves understanding honey bee pest biology, regularly monitoring for pests, and using a combination of different methods to control their damage. Visit these resources for more information:

For Beekeepers:

The California Master Beekeeper Program

EL Niño Bee Lab Courses

EL Niño Bee Lab Newsletter

For All Bee Lovers:

EL Niño Bee Lab Newsletter

Haagen Dazs Honey Bee Haven plant list

UC IPM Bee Precaution Pesticide Ratings and video tutorial

Sources for the Value of Honey Bees:

Calderone N. 2012. Insect-pollinated crops, Insect Pollinators and US Agriculture: Trend Analysis of Aggregate Data for the Period 1992–2009. 

Flottum K. 2017. U.S. Honey Industry Report, 2016.

A beekeeper carefully observes individual frames of a colony to monitor for pests and diseases; monitoring is one of the most important components of an effective IPM program. Photo by Elina Niño.

Posted on Friday, August 18, 2017 at 11:36 AM

Sunpreme raisins a hit at the UC Kearney Grape Day 2017

Excitement over the new Sunpreme raisins was evident at UC Kearney Grape Day Aug. 8, 2017. As soon as the tram stopped, dozens of farmers and other industry professionals rushed over to the vineyard to take a close look and sample the fruit. Raisins pulled from the vine were meaty with very little residual seed. The flavor was a deep, sweet floral with a muscat note.

Sunpreme raisins, bred by now-retired USDA breeder David Ramming, promise a nearly labor-free raisin production system. Traditionally, raisins are picked and placed on paper trays on the vineyard floor to dry. The development of dried-on-the-vine varieties opened the door to greater mechanization. Workers would cut the stems above clusters...

Read more.

Sunpreme raisins drying on their own in a Kearney vineyard.

Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2017 at 10:39 AM

Kearney says farewell to retiring UCCE IPM advisor Pete Goodell

Kearney family sent off UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor Pete Goodell with a pot luck lunch and warm wishes today, his last before completing a distinguished 36-year career, the last 26 at Kearney. Read more about Goodell's career here.

The University of California has conferred on Goodell the honor of emeritus status, enabling him to fulfill his goal of working in collaborative entomology during retirement. Goodell and his colleagues will bring together a diverse group of Californians to enhance understanding of pests, pesticides and integrated pest management.

In retirement he will also pursue his passion for the Great Outdoors. Goodell plans to hike the John Muir Trail one segment at a time, and visit the National Parks in the western United States in style, by staying at historical lodges.

Kearney director Jeff Dahlberg, right, presented letters, a certificate and medallion to the retiring advisor. In the center is Pete's longtime colleague Cherie McDougald.
 
Pete is known for his honesty. He says, "A cap is an honest toupe."
 
Pete thanked his wife of 42 years, Nancy, for supporting him throughout his demanding career.
 
Pete's first mobile phone. Calls cost 50 cents per minute.
 
Pete's first transportable computer.
 
Several of Pete's colleagues praised his integrity, professionalism and work ethic, including (clockwise from upper left) retired entomology farm advisor Rich Coviello, Kearney director Jeff Dahlberg, Kearney program and facility coordinator Laura Van der Staay, and UC IPM academic coordinator Lori Berger.
 
Pete's colleagues and friends wrote retirement sentiments on Jenga blocks. For Pete, Jenga represents the complexity and interconnectedness of systems - pest control systems, social support systems, any system.
Pete collected his name badges since graduate school. He said they represented the many opportunities UC offered for collaboration and extension.
Posted on Thursday, June 29, 2017 at 1:13 PM

Future water leaders soak up irrigation information

University of California students are taking a long journey through California to trace the state's complicated and critical water supply. The recent graduates and upper-division co-eds from UC Merced, UC Santa Cruz, UC Berkeley and UC Davis are part of the UC Water Academy, a course that combines online training with a two-week field trip for first-hand knowledge about California water.

The tour began June 18 at Lake Shasta, the state's largest reservoir, and followed the water's course to the Sacramento Valley, through the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and south along the Delta-Mendota Canal. Since a key water destination is agriculture, the UC Water Academy toured the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension June 23, where research is underway to determine how the state's water supply can be most efficiently transformed into a food supply for Americans.

Traveling in two vans, 10 students, a teachers' assistant and two professors are following the course of California water.

“You're visiting a place ideal for growing high-quality fruits and vegetables, because of the Mediterranean climate and low insect and disease pressure,” said Jeff Dahlberg, director of the UC KREC.

Kearney director Jeff Dahlberg leads a tour.

UC Cooperative Extension water management specialist Khaled Bali joined the students next to his alfalfa research plot, where different irrigation regimens are compared to determine the maximum yield that can be harvested with the minimum amount of water.

“It used to be that the No. 1 objective was to maximize yield,” Bali said. “But with the limited supplies and the cost of water, now the No. 1 objective is to get the maximum economic return. Growers might be better off selling some of their water to other jurisdictions.”

UCCE water management specialist Khaled Bali speaks about his alfalfa irrigation research.

A water tour wouldn't be complete without an introduction to drought research. A recently planted sorghum trial provided the backdrop.

“California is a great place to study drought tolerance,” Dahlberg said, “because you can induce a drought by withholding irrigation.”

UC Berkeley student Chelsee Andreozzi, right, asks a question while Tessa Maurer takes notes on a smart phone. UCB student Brian Kastl is in the background.

The sizable field contains 1,800 plots with 600 sorghum cultivars under three irrigation schemes: one irrigated as usual, one in which water is cut off before the plants flower, and the final one where water is cut off after the plants flower.

“Every week, a drone flies over to collect data on the leaf area, plant height and biomass,” Dalberg said. “Hopefully we will get associations with gene expression and this phenotype data."

Recently emerged sorghum that is part of a trial aiming to tease out the genes that express drought tolerance.

Dahlberg and his collaborating researchers believe identifying the genes responsible for drought tolerance in sorghum will help scientists find drought-tolerant genes in other cereal crops – such as wheat, corn, rice and millet. “This will go a long way to feeding the people of the world,” he said.

There is still much to learn about sorghum drought tolerance – is it conferred by the plant's waxy leaves, the way stomata are controlled, accumulation of sugar in the leaves, or a mechanism in the roots?

“These are all questions you will have to answer to feed the world,” Dahlberg said. “That's why I would encourage you to continue studying water. There's a lot for you to get into.”

Students gather in the post harvest laboratory at Kearney.

A third-year earth science student at UC Santa Cruz and a member of the academy, Denise Payan, said the sense of responsibility for the future is not daunting, but encouraging.

“It makes me feel like I can make a difference,” she said. The tour through California is shaping her plans for the future, which may include a career at the intersection of geology and biology.

“This has opened my eyes to a lot of issues,” she said.

The next stop for the UC Water Academy is the vast Tulare Lake basin to learn about groundwater recharge before heading east to the Owens Valley and the shores of Mono Lake. From there the academy turns to the Sierra Nevada to visit San Francisco's water supply, which is collected by Hetch Hetchy Dam. The field trip ends with a two-day rafting trip on the American River.

The UC Water Academy is offered through UC Water and led by UC Merced professor Joshua Viers and UC Cooperative Extension water management specialist Ted Grantham. In addition to the two-week tour, students participated in weekly online meetings and complete a project on communicating California water issues to public stakeholders. Students receive 1 unit of academic credit.

 

Posted on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 at 8:41 AM

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